Back to Exhibition

From Our Catalog:
Slaughterhouse-five, or, The children's crusade : a duty-dance with death by Kurt Vonnegut, 1969

Slaughterhouse-five, or, The children's crusade : a duty-dance with death  by Kurt Vonnegut, 1969
Kirkus: /* Starred Review */ This is "my famous book about Dresden," the book that Vonnegut has been agonizing over ever since he sweated out the Allied fire-bombing that killed 130 thousand people. . . more than Hiroshima. And "All this happened, more or less." Expectedly, Vonnegut deals in ironic undercuts and shell-shocked satire. His main character, Billy Pilgrim is a pitiable buffoon zombied by bazookas who lapses into disoriented time trips and will survive to become an optometrist who believes he's been on a different planet. The author flashes scenes back and forth from here to then like a schizophrenetic cameraman--just delicately tapping the madness. There's a terrible eight-day trip as Pilgrim, a P.O.W., is taken to his first prison camp where the English are appalled bythe scruffy Americans. And there's the final transfer to Slaughterhouse-Five in the stockyards of Dresden where they are put to work in a syrup factory, and feel reasonably secure, blithely unaware of the impending holocaust. Mr. Rosewater is here again and there's Edgar Derby; the patriotic high school teacher finally shot to death for stealing a teapot as well as little Paul Lazarro who plans to hire gangsters to kill his enemies-after the war. Then comes the fire storm and "It is so short and jumbled and jangled. . . because there is nothing intelligent to say about a massacre but it is precise jumble and jangle, disconcerting and ultimately devastating. (Kirkus Reviews, March 1, 1969)
 
Source of review: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=neh&tg=UI&an=060706&site=novp-live
share:
Back to Exhibition