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Trying the Experiment, ca. 1832

The role of the Second Bank of the United States became a significant issue during the 1832 presidential election between Andrew Jackson and Henry Clay. Some at the time argued that the special position held by the Second Bank conferred undue political power and privilege upon its administrators. Jackson himself had spoke out against the idea of a national bank and was forced to take a more forceful position when his presidential opponent and congressional rivals passed a bill to recharter the Second Bank. As President he vetoed the bill and took a firm stance on the issue. Clay tried to use this veto against Jackson during the 1832 election yet ultimately lost and President Jackson was elected to a second term. This anti-Jackson cartoon presents a lively depiction of this banking struggle that has come to be known as the Bank War. The right side shows the bank's president Nicholas Biddle and the pro-bank contingent standing firm against Jackson and his anti-bank cohorts.

Source:
Mintz, S., & McNeil, S. (2012). The Bank War. Digital History. Retrieved (9/7/2012) from: http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/disp_textbook.cfm?smtID=3&psid=303

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